Would you ever just SHUT UP?!

…Ever wanted to say that to someone?

Maybe someone who bounced up to you as you came out of the ring to tell you what you SHOULD have done and point out where you went wrong?

Like you didn’t already know what went wrong!

If there’s one time you don’t want to be told what went wrong, it’s in those first 15 seconds- 5 minutes after, when you’re still pumping adrenalin, trying to get a lead on your dog and get your breath back. Frankly I think it’s the lack of breath that prevents more trainers and “helpful” people getting slapped when they do this!!

Time and time again people ask me how to cope with people telling them what they did wrong, but not what they did RIGHT! Blimey, any wonder people get discouraged!

But here’s something you can do for yourself– without having to wait for someone else to notice… and it’s been proven to be a key factor used by elite sportspeople more effectively than by those who get stuck at lesser heights.

Realistic performance evaluation.

Fancy term for saying that you aim to note both the strengths as well as the growing edges in your performance. Ignore the areas for improvement and clearly you’re not going to get better. But we also know from research that you need self-confidence and motivation to excel. By having an even-handed approach to our performance we give ourselves evidence that gives credibility to our self-confidence, which in turn helps motivate us that we CAN achieve our goals.

So next time you step out in training or competition, don’t wait for anyone else to tell you what was good (or what you can improve on next time)- analyse your own performance. And if you can’t find any positives, your vision is impaired because I will bet you that they’re there- even if you can’t see them yet. Don’t worry, you can learn to see them- keep going!

Be your own cheerleader and fair critic. Not one or the otheryou need BOTH to excel.

Happy competing! 

Don’t forget to get onto Facebook and tell me what you found most useful in this article! I’d love to hear your stories,

Kathrine